1. Getting Started
Home
Introduction
2. Right Hand
Position
Finger Freedom
3. Harp Style
Basics
Variations
Examples and Chords
4. Celtic Ornamentation
Left-hand
Right-hand
Triplet Variations
Thumb Triplets
Percussive
5. Related Tunings
CGCGCD
DAAEAE
Others
6. Scales in DADGAD
Overview
Detailed Charts
7. Chords in DADGAD
Overview
Detailed Charts
8. Tablature
Performance Notes
Notation Guide
9. Articles
Miscellaneous Topics

    

Play DADGAD - Simon Fox
Generic major
Amaj
A#maj
Bmaj
Cmaj
C#maj
Dmaj
D#maj
Emaj
Fmaj
F#maj
Gmaj
G#maj
Generic minor
Amin
A#min
Bmin
Cmin
C#min
Dmin
D#min
Emin
Fmin
F#min
Gmin
G#min

 

6. Chords in DADGAD

In DADGAD the open strings are commonly used to create resonant chord voicings. However, it is a good idea to have a range of closed chord shapes available that do not use any open strings. Just as in standard tuning, these shapes are easy to move up and down the neck to gain access to a wide range of keys. In the chord menu bar above, the generic major and minor links provide a range of these shapes.

Each possible root note also has a major and minor link above providing chord charts. Emphasis is given to chords which use the open strings in some interesting way. Often chords will have similar sets of notes, but in DADGAD it is the fingering variations that point to new melodies and tune directions. Generally these chords are not designed for heavy strumming, but rather as "broken" chords which we partially use to move a melody from one place to the next.

Playing Chord Audio

To hear each chord simply click on the chart and your browser will open a MIDI file player to sound the chord for you. This may be Apple QuickTime or Windows Media Player depending on how your browser is setup.

Get Started Quickly

Click Here to get started with a set of 18 handy chords.

 

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